Hearing Loss and Depression

  • By proadAccountId-358356
  • 20 Dec, 2015

Those who suffer from hearing loss are less likely to participate in social activities, leading to withdrawal and isolation. In turn, these changes in social activity can lead to serious negative emotional consequences, including depression and its related symptoms: anxiety, anger, frustration, paranoia and emotional instability. 

Because hearing loss is an "invisible disability", personality changes may not be immediately connected to hearing loss. Due to the increasing prevalence of hearing loss, however, it should be suspected as a possible cause when a loved one begins to withdraw from previously enjoyable social activities.  

The answer may be as simple as wearing and using hearing devices. Multiple studies performed by the Better Hearing Institue consistently found significant improvements in psychosocial and cognitive conditions when hearing loss was treated. 

 The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has established guidelines for determining when an individual should seek a hearing evaluation. Signs to look for include:

 ·         Difficulty understanding speech, especially when background noise is present.

·        The individual isolates him or herself from social gatherings and public situations.

·        They watch television or listen to music at a much louder volume than normal.

·        They often ask people to repeat themselves.

 Because mental health affects so many other facets of an otherwise healthy lifestyle, it’s important to encourage loved ones suffering from depression to seek treatment. Even mild forms of hearing loss can lead to an increased risk of negative emotional experiences. The sooner these are discovered, the better the odds of successful treatment.

 

By proadAccountId-358356 01 Feb, 2016
Hearing loss often creeps up on us so gradually, that we tend to start accommodating for it without realizing it.  The volume on the tv or radio starts increasing, you find yourself leaning in to hear speech-in-noise, and you may even catch yourself cupping your hand behind your ear or saying, "What?" more and more.  So how do you know when it is time to take charge of your hearing and schedule a comprehensive audiological assessment?  

Here are some good questions you can ask yourself: 
1. Do people seem to mumble or speak in a softer voice than they used to?
2. Do you feel tired or irritable after a long conversation?
3. Do you sometimes miss key words in a sentence, or frequently need to ask people to repeat themselves?
4. When you are in a group or in a crowded restaurant, is it difficult for you to follow the conversation?
5. When you are together with other people, does background noise bother you?
6. Do you often need to turn up the volume on your TV or radio?
7. Do you find it difficult to hear the doorbell or the telephone ring?
8. Is carrying on a telephone conversation difficult?
9. Do you find it difficult to pinpoint where an object is (e.g. an alarm clock or a telephone) from the noise it makes?
10. Has someone close to you mentioned that you might have a problem with your hearing?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, it is time to evaluate your hearing.  Call The Center for Audiology at 713-255-0035, and start your journey to better hearing, and better quality of life!

By proadAccountId-358356 20 Dec, 2015

Those who suffer from hearing loss are less likely to participate in social activities, leading to withdrawal and isolation. In turn, these changes in social activity can lead to serious negative emotional consequences, including depression and its related symptoms: anxiety, anger, frustration, paranoia and emotional instability. 

Because hearing loss is an "invisible disability", personality changes may not be immediately connected to hearing loss. Due to the increasing prevalence of hearing loss, however, it should be suspected as a possible cause when a loved one begins to withdraw from previously enjoyable social activities.  

The answer may be as simple as wearing and using hearing devices. Multiple studies performed by the Better Hearing Institue consistently found significant improvements in psychosocial and cognitive conditions when hearing loss was treated. 

 The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has established guidelines for determining when an individual should seek a hearing evaluation. Signs to look for include:

 ·         Difficulty understanding speech, especially when background noise is present.

·        The individual isolates him or herself from social gatherings and public situations.

·        They watch television or listen to music at a much louder volume than normal.

·        They often ask people to repeat themselves.

 Because mental health affects so many other facets of an otherwise healthy lifestyle, it’s important to encourage loved ones suffering from depression to seek treatment. Even mild forms of hearing loss can lead to an increased risk of negative emotional experiences. The sooner these are discovered, the better the odds of successful treatment.

 

Share by: